Month: November 2016

Sign Pdf iOS Mail App

Did you know that your iOS device has a built-in PDF creator? And did you know that it also lets you sign or otherwise mark up PDFs without the need for a third-party app?

ios8mailEspecially on iOS, putting one’s digital signature on a document is easiest when that document is in PDF format. But the thing is, on many occasions, what gets emailed to me is a Word document, which I need to convert to PDF first before I can digitally sign on my iPhone. Thankfully, I’ve mastered the trick of creating and signing PDFs without ever leaving the Mail app on iOS, which you, too, can learn, for whatever purpose you might need it for, by reading the rest of this article

adobe-acrobat-pdf-file-512

If the Mail attachment that you need to sign is already in PDF format, then you’re in luck. The steps to marking up a PDF attachment and then replying with the marked-up version are pretty straightforward.

    1. In the Mail app, open the message with the PDF attachment you want to sign.
    2. Tap and hold the attachment, and then tap the “Markup and Reply” option at the bottom row of the share sheet markup-tool-box-213x213.
    3. In the Markup screen, tap the signature tool at the bottom.
    4. If it’s your first time to use the signature tool, enter your signature using your finger, and then tap Done. If not, you’ll be prompted to choose an existing signature or add a new one.
    5. Resize and reposition your signature on the document, and then tap Done.
    6. The signed version of the document is automatically attached to a new message in reply to the original message. Type your message (if any), and then tap Send.

time-to-celebrate

 

Wait! we done only half part yet. lets do signature for  document type files

 

 

doc-icon

If the Mail attachment that you need to sign is in a format other than PDF, say, Word .doc, you first have to convert it to PDF before you can mark it up. Admittedly, the steps are somewhat more involved, but they’ll cease to be so once you get the hang of the procedure.

  1. In the Mail app, open the message with the attachment you want to sign.
  2. Tap the attachment to open it.
  3. Tap the share icon, and then tap the Print option at the bottom row of the share sheet.
  4. On the Printer Options screen, pinch outward on the print preview. A PDF version of the document is then automatically created and displayed for viewing.
  5. Tap the share icon, and then tap the Mail option at the top row of the share sheet.
  6. The PDF version of the document is automatically attached to a new email message. Tap and hold the attachment, and in the contextual menu, tap Select and then Markup.
  7. In the Markup screen, tap the signature tool at the bottom.
  8. If it’s your first time to use the signature tool, enter your signature using your finger, and then tap Done. If not, you’ll be prompted to choose an existing signature or add a new one.
  9. Resize and reposition your signature on the document, and then tap Done.
  10. The attachment is now the signed PDF version, ready to be sent. Enter the email address of the recipient, enter a subject, type a note, and tap Send.

 

 

credits: appadvice

Chrome policy  on ad blocking 

HIGHLIGHTGoogle makes a majority of its revenues due to digital ads

  • The company wants to fix obtrusive ads, instead of blocking them
  • Ads need to be more acceptable, for the fear of them being blocked

At the Chrome Dev Summit 2016, where it was revealed that the popular Web browser now has 2 billion active users, Google also shared its stand on ad-blocking, and it should come as no surprise.

Google’s primary revenue source is ads, and its approach is to fix what’s wrong with ads instead of putting them off the table entirely by building an ad-blocker into Chrome, something the likes of Opera have done in the past. CNET interviewed Darin Fisher, VP of Chrome Engineering who said, “We feel like there are a lot of challenges in advertising. There are a lot of wrong ways. If publishers and advertisers do ads the right way, it can be great for the users and for the ecosystem”.

There has been a constant battle between the pro-user experience camp that wants to avoid ads or tracking mechanisms because they’re too intrusive and resource-consuming, and websites blocking such users because ads are the primary revenue for many. In August this year, there started a cat-and-mouse game between Facebook and popular ad-blocking service AdBlock Plus, where the latter would allow blocking of ads on Facebook, only for that service to rendered useless soon after.

It’s not just ad-blocking apps, some browsers themselves have moved to the offensive by offering such built-in features. Opera unveiled such a feature May this year, while Samsung built an ad-blocker into its own browse. Apple too introduced a mechanism for third-party apps to block ads and other content in iOS 9 the year before.

Google has also tried to restrain the rise of content blocking Android apps, by revamping developer guidelines that explicitly say that “apps that block or interfere with other another app displaying ads” is a violation of the Google Play Developer Distribution Agreement. Also, ad-blocking services have come under fire too, for allowing certain ads to pass through, for the sake of making revenues themselves. AdBlock Plus unveiled an ‘Acceptable Ads’ platform that sells and serves ads to its users. Popular iOS content blocker app Crystal also let certain ads pass through for paying publishers.

Google is taking initiative to improve ads with efforts like the Coalition for Better Ads, which includes other big names like Facebook. Considering many of the world’s businesses are running due to online advertisements, the concern of consumers using ad-blocking services is graver than ever

Credits : NDTV